Roundup class action

Has anyone else received calls from lawyers asking you to meet with a client to review and sign 6-page document relating to Roundup lawsuit? No notarization required. Just want a professional type person to be present. Got my name from Snapdocs. I got two calls in one night. Both from different states. Anyone have experience with this?

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I have not but if it is from a company that I think it is. They have paid me after I spoke of them here in Notary Cafe’.
So I would probably not have to join that class action. Unless, that is of course they are going to get my back low ball pay fees. Then sign me up.

Have done a few ‘class action’ signings for lawyers. They usually pay well & quickly, but if they don’t, the cool thing about non-paying lawyers is you threaten to contact their local bar association about the non-payment and then you get paid right away because they don’t want to look bad to their peers. I’ve never had to do this, but know that it works.

I too have received phone calls asking for such a service, and I do these, as a Paralegal, not under my notary hat; unless a notary public is also a bonafide Paralegal, they should NOT take on these types of assignments .

As a paralegal, when working for an attorney/law firm, I’m somewhat “protected” when conducting these types of assignments, because I am legally under a contractual obligation and under the direction/supervision of the client/assigned attorney. As a notary public, we are not protected like this. I do believe one of, if not the main reason, why notaries are getting these calls, is because there are more of us than there are independent paralegals. Anyway, I would strongly advise against taking on these gigs, unless you’re also a Paralegal with years of experience under your belt, because you will need this when dealing with litigants. A simple non-attorney notary public may not have the skills needed to participate and handle the uptine questions involved in such meetings. Too many risk for notaries public in my non-legal advice opinion.

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Ok. I’m sure you ccavena know more than me on this, and my 30 years as an actual paralegal doesn’t really mean anything…believe what you want. Not gonna argue with ignorance…

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A notary is less qualified than a paralegal, but not less protected, in my opinion. As notaries, we are never to answer legal questions. Just making sure they read or sign certain documents, with one hand on our cell phones to call the attorney’s office if there are questions, should not be any different than explaining those documents we do the loan closings with. And we are backed by our E&O policies, to boot!

And that, is just my own humble opinion.

The role of a paralegal is to guide people through certain legal proceedings (immigration, child custody, divorce…) and prepare the documents. In this sense a paralegal is more qualified than a notary. In fact, in most states a notary cannot create a legal document. Your statements about leaving a simple class action suit to the paralegals comes off as disingenuous and self serving. This smacks of the SC BAR which does not allow a notary to notarize loans. Apparently they have the entire state hoodwinked that you need a law degree to 1) check ID, 2) review forms for empty entries, 3) show a signer where to sign, 4) sign, date and stamp a document. Ludicrous.

How is this different than notarizing a will, POA, Deed of Trust, Deeds, structured settlements, and other documents that need the eye of a notary? We do not create the documents nor do we question any choices the signer makes in a will or POA. We are forbidden from offering any advice or guidance. We simply Identify the signer and witness the signing. I assure you we are quite capable of this and probably for a much lower fee. I did a structured settlement for $11,000,000. I just saw that it was signed and dated in the right places, no brain cycles required.

As already mentioned we have E-O insurance so there is no need to plant fear and doubt in the minds of notaries.
Your 30 years of experience are of no relevance here as the docs are created by attorneys and the notary simply gets them signed. You do your job and we will do ours. I have done and will continue to do class action suits without hesitation. My only criteria is that the fee is commensurate with the task.

Actually you’re really not doing these as a notary either - you’re dong them as a signing agent. Notary E&O won’t cover anything associated with these unless there IS something to be notarized and there is a notarial error involved.

I see no problem accommodating these but keep in mind you wearing the “signing agent” hat, not the “notary” hat - and offer no opinions or advice.

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My point clearly an overmiss with some…

Actually, neither hat is worn.