Wearing a lanyard

Do any of you wear a lanyard to show your notorial certification during your signing?
Do you think that it is necessary, or professional?

Thanks

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As to your two questions…nope and nope. :slight_smile:

Excuse me - three questions - nope, nope and nope… :smiley:

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Me neither. I get the occasional signer who is upset because I ask to see their ID and then asks if they can see mine, even though the title company already has all of my information. annoying.

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Two points come to mind.

  1. My state does not provide any sort of ID badge for notaries. I think making up one’s own ID badge is a red flag; if someone finds out a person made one themselves it creates suspicion.
  2. Of the people you find around the places where notarizations occur, who would you like to associate yourself with? Judges? Town clerks? Lawyers? Bank tellers? Fast food workers? I’d like to associate myself with the judges and lawyers; they don’t wear name badges.
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Oh my gosh YES!
People who ask to see my ID, I’m guessing, do that because of pride and or ignorance.
While I have no problem showing them my I D It’s really annoying
One time someone asked to see my ID and I showed them my old ID to see
if they could tell it was out of date… just to be cheeky :grin:

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Nope x 3. I DO have business cards…and everybody gets one. Don’t even have my ID…it’s in the car. Never thought about it, but Ashton made a good point about ‘making one up’. My state, AR, does provide a wallet card (no picture…really worthless as ID) and that’s in my briefcase (somewhere). Never had anyone ask for ID.

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Thanks Arichter I think I’m going to write “notary” with a pencil or crayon and put it in a lanyard to show
Let’s see what their reaction is then…LOL

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I want to tell them: “For crying out loud… I already have your social security number, your address, and other personal information in my signing package. Why would the title company risk giving that kind of information to someone that wasn’t a notary!?” but I never acutally say that :grin: I just think it

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Absolutely! :grin:

As my great-uncle used to say: "Some are meant to play Chess and some to play only Checkers . . . "

:swan:

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I have a badge with my name and title on it to show my signers.

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I remember the opening scene in a Tom Cruz movie where he played an assassin. To gain entrance to the victims hi security residence Tom told the guard he was a (mobile) Notary Public and not surprising he was cleared to walk in and kill the guy. I’m not sure how this applies to your question though.

Some, actually most people are very apprehensive to let strangers in their home, me included. So it’s up to you to talk to the signer ahead of time and not be too early or late for your meeting. My 25 years as a professed “professional guest” has taught me a lot about the how to’s of this business, a critical piece of info that the 6 figure internet talking heads haven’t a clue about.

Luckly, loan signer muppets are meeting with people who lending institutions are willing to a take great risk with. You are there to bring a satisfactory end to a long, difficult process and the signers are fully aware of your role. Yes they received their Closing Statement several days prior and are also fully aware of your $250-$300 notary fee. This might explain the shock and awe some of them have when the notary arrives looking,smelling,dressed,acting, and talking like a Troll.

They (signers) have no idea you accepted the assignment for $65 with scanbacks, but I digress.

I decided years ago, 1999 in fact to have a shareable digital business card with my picture on it that I email or text to the signer long before we meet, so the client knows exactly who I am. Now I have an expensive website that bears my name, notary public not some corporate alias. This has worked for me throughout a career, a career that leans heavily towards General Notary Work but also includes Mortgage loans.

Yes, get a lanyard, who knows it might save your life.

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Hi Jenn, I wear my gov’t issued photo ID in my lanyard so that I can easily show when I come to the signers’ door. But no, not a notarial certification. I carry a copy of my notary commission and business license inside my notary case, in case someone feels the need to see “proof” that I am a notary. But so far no one ever has asked to see it.

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I’m with @Carmen_Lane in how she demonstrates her preparation for identity in case asked. I too carry a copy of my business license and commission in my briefcase. I do not wear any visible proof of identity, but I am always willing and ready to show ID when asked. It is not an unreasonable request of strangers walking into your home.

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Wow what interesting insight, especially about the Tom Cruise movie :eyes::eyes::astonished:

ok, so just a photo is good. I like that some signing services send our picture to the client before hand also.

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Yes, this is very often the case. But because I am arriving at their home and the first thing I do is demand to see their ID, I feel like it is only fair I should also be prepared to show my ID to them as well. I want to do whatever makes my signers feel the most comfortable. If they need assurance that I am indeed me, I am perfectly okay with it. :smiley:

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Yes, I have no problem showing them my ID, the issue I have is: that does not prove that I’m a notary or that I’m their notary. The prooof of if I’m the correct person is if the information they got from the title company matches my arrival. I could have a fake ID, a fake notarial certificate etc. They are relying on the title company who picked me in the first place.

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But what are the chances that you have an assignment sheet (your contract with the hiring company) that contains their name, address, phone, and plus a copy of their loan documents to sign, not to mention their lender/title co contacts – and NOT be the notary who was assigned to do the job? If the signers are truly in doubt, they could contact always contact their loan officer for verification. And yes, if the title company is who hired you, you likely had to provide them proof that you are indeed a notary. And your SigningAgent.com profile shows clear proof to any potential hiring company that you are a notary, if that is how they found you.

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yes yes yes yes yes and yes

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Jenn_screenshot

Suggestion: in your SigningAgent.com profile, change “accepts eDoc” to YES

You would login to your NNA profile nationalnotary.org, under Hello Jenn: click MY NNA,
on the left side click My Signing Agent Profile, click edit, under Services, change to YES.
I am pretty sure that is the step by step way to do it. Cheers!

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